Human Conception

“Life is life – whether in a cat, or dog or man. There is no difference there between a cat or a man. The idea of difference is a human conception for man’s own advantage.”

~ Sri Aurobindo

Two Kinds Of Truth

There are two kinds of truths: truth of reasoning and truths of fact. Truths of reasoning are necessary and their opposite is impossible; those of fact are contingent and their opposite is possible.

~ Gottfried Leibniz

Life Is The Fire …..

Life is the fire that burns and the sun that gives light. Life is the wind and the rain and the thunder in the sky. Life is matter and is earth, what is and what is not, and what beyond is in Eternty.

~ Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Wondering Evermore

out the door
with the
backpack
containing
only with
the basics
of necessities
in order to
find
seek/
search/
and/or locate
the meaning
of truth
that is
does it
truly exist
or is it
a figment
of our
collective
imagination
if so
then can
we say
that the
human race
is living
in a world
of fantasy
will i/we/us
ever figure
it out

Thoughts

“Thoughts become perception, perception becomes reality. Alter your thoughts, alter your reality.”
– William James

Animal

“I don’t care whether animals are capable of thinking; all I care about is that they are capable of suffering!” – Jeremy Bentham

Know Thyself

“The aim of human life is to know thyself. Think for yourself. Question authority. Think with your friends. Create, create new realities. Philosophy is a team sport. Philosophy is the ultimate, the ultimate aphrodisiac pleasure. Learning how to operate your brain, learning how to operate your mind, learning how to redesign chaos” – Timothy Leary

Socrates Quote

“Employ your time in
improving yourself by
other men’s writing so
that you shall come
easily by what others
have labored hard for.”

-Socrates

Opinions

“New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but because they are not already common.”

–John Locke

Free Thinking

Others indeed may talk, and write,
and fight about liberty, and make
outward pretense to it; but the
free-thinker alone is truly free.

George Berkeley

Wealth

Wealth is like sea-water; the more
we drink, the thirstier we become;
and the same is true of fame.

Sir Arthur Charles Clarke

I Live

I live for today.

Tomorrow I will, that is if it comes, as we never know what will happen.

Yesterday, why dwell on it. It’s done. It’s history. What ever happened, happened. So why worry about it. Move on.

That’s my philosophy.

Observation

The Indian philosopher J. Krishnamurti once remarked that
observing without evaluating is the highest form of human
intelligence. When I first read this statement, the thought,
‘What nonsense!’ shot through my mind before I realized that
I had just made an evaluation.

— Marshall Rosenberg

Advice

Look, I really don’t want to wax philosophical, but I will say that
if you’re alive, you got to flap your arms and legs, you got to
jump around a lot, you got to make a lot of noise, because life
is the very opposite of death. And therefore, as I see it, if
you’re quiet, you’re not living. You’ve got to be noisy, or at
least your thoughts should be noisy and colorful and lively.

— Mel Brooks

Truth

Socrates showed us that thinking the truth is not enough. Truth demands to be lived. –Americ Azevedo

Socrates

Socrates

Keep this in mind the next time you are about to repeat a rumor or spread gossip.

In ancient Greece (469 – 399 BC), Socrates was widely lauded for his wisdom. One day an acquaintance ran up to him excitedly and said, “Socrates, do you know what I just heard about Diogenes?”

“Wait a moment,” Socrates replied, “Before you tell me I’d like you to pass a little test. It’s called the Triple Filter Test.”

“Triple filter?” asked the acquaintance.

“That’s right,” Socrates continued, “Before you talk to me about Diogenes let’s take a moment to filter what you’re going to say. The first filter is Truth. Have you made absolutely sure that what you are about to tell me is true?”

“No,” the man said, “Actually I just heard about it.”

“All right,” said Socrates, “So you don’t really know if it’s true or not. Now let’s try the second filter, the filter of Goodness. Is what you are about to tell me about Diogenes something good?”

“No, on the contrary…”

“So,” Socrates continued, “You want to tell me something about Diogenes that may be bad, even though you’re not certain it’s true?”

The man shrugged, a little embarrassed. Socrates continued, “You may still pass the test though, because there is a third filter, the filter of Usefulness. Is what you want to tell me about Diogenes going to be useful to me?”

“No, not really.”

“Well,” concluded Socrates, “If what you want to tell me is neither True nor Good nor even Useful, why tell it to me or anyone at all?”

The man was bewildered and ashamed. This is an example of why Socrates was a great philosopher and held in such high esteem.

It also explains why Socrates never found out that Diogenes was banging his wife.