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When the weather
is nice you will
see the city
square philosopher
talking to people
about the meaning
of life and any
other philosophical
thoughts you care
to exchange with him

I Live

I live for today.

Tomorrow I will, that is if it comes, as we never know what will happen.

Yesterday, why dwell on it. It’s done. It’s history. What ever happened, happened. So why worry about it. Move on.

That’s my philosophy.

Observation

The Indian philosopher J. Krishnamurti once remarked that
observing without evaluating is the highest form of human
intelligence. When I first read this statement, the thought,
‘What nonsense!’ shot through my mind before I realized that
I had just made an evaluation.

— Marshall Rosenberg

Advice

Look, I really don’t want to wax philosophical, but I will say that
if you’re alive, you got to flap your arms and legs, you got to
jump around a lot, you got to make a lot of noise, because life
is the very opposite of death. And therefore, as I see it, if
you’re quiet, you’re not living. You’ve got to be noisy, or at
least your thoughts should be noisy and colorful and lively.

— Mel Brooks

Socrates

Socrates

Keep this in mind the next time you are about to repeat a rumor or spread gossip.

In ancient Greece (469 – 399 BC), Socrates was widely lauded for his wisdom. One day an acquaintance ran up to him excitedly and said, “Socrates, do you know what I just heard about Diogenes?”

“Wait a moment,” Socrates replied, “Before you tell me I’d like you to pass a little test. It’s called the Triple Filter Test.”

“Triple filter?” asked the acquaintance.

“That’s right,” Socrates continued, “Before you talk to me about Diogenes let’s take a moment to filter what you’re going to say. The first filter is Truth. Have you made absolutely sure that what you are about to tell me is true?”

“No,” the man said, “Actually I just heard about it.”

“All right,” said Socrates, “So you don’t really know if it’s true or not. Now let’s try the second filter, the filter of Goodness. Is what you are about to tell me about Diogenes something good?”

“No, on the contrary…”

“So,” Socrates continued, “You want to tell me something about Diogenes that may be bad, even though you’re not certain it’s true?”

The man shrugged, a little embarrassed. Socrates continued, “You may still pass the test though, because there is a third filter, the filter of Usefulness. Is what you want to tell me about Diogenes going to be useful to me?”

“No, not really.”

“Well,” concluded Socrates, “If what you want to tell me is neither True nor Good nor even Useful, why tell it to me or anyone at all?”

The man was bewildered and ashamed. This is an example of why Socrates was a great philosopher and held in such high esteem.

It also explains why Socrates never found out that Diogenes was banging his wife.